CotR Deck Spotlight: A Three Hour Tour

The introduction of RingsDB has invigorated the Lord of the Rings community, sparking creativity and enabling the sharing of ideas at a rate never before seen. With this explosive growth in new content, however, it is becoming easier and easier for interesting and exceptional work to fall through the cracks. The Deck Spotlight project is an attempt by the Cardboard of the Rings community to direct attention to deserving decks that, for one reason or another, have escaped notice.

Selected decks and fellowships might be especially unusual, creative, unique, strategic, or thematic. They might be funny, illuminating, powerful, or noteworthy for any of a number of other reasons. In all cases, however, the decks are worth a closer look. Join us today, as CoTR shines a spotlight on…

A Three Hour Tour

by Denison

http://ringsdb.com/decklist/view/1521/a-three-hour-tour-1.0

Hero (3)
Arwen Undómiel (The Dread Realm)
Denethor (Flight of the Stormcaller)
Galdor of the Havens (The Grey Havens)

Ally (26)
3x Elven Jeweler (Escape from Mount Gram)
1x Erestor (The Long Dark)
1x Galadriel (The Road Darkens)
3x Gandalf (Over Hill and Under Hill)
3x Gildor Inglorion (The Hills of Emyn Muil)
3x Glorfindel (Flight of the Stormcaller)
3x Guardian of Rivendell (Flight of the Stormcaller)
2x Imladris Caregiver (Flight of the Stormcaller)
1x Lindir (The Battle of Carn Dûm)
2x Lindon Navigator (The Grey Havens)
1x Quickbeam (The Treason of Saruman)
3x Treebeard (The Antlered Crown)

Attachment (3)
3x To the Sea, to the Sea! (The Grey Havens)

Event (21)
3x A Test of Will (Core Set)
3x A Very Good Tale (Over Hill and Under Hill)
3x Daeron’s Runes (Foundations of Stone)
3x Elrond’s Counsel (The Watcher in the Water)
3x Elven-light (The Dread Realm)
3x Elwing’s Flight (The Grey Havens)
3x The Evening Star (The Grey Havens)

I’m a fan of fast starts. I’m generally of the opinion that the first planning phase is pretty much the only point all game where you’re free to do what you want without any interference from the encounter deck, (barring a particularly disastrous setup). So when I build a deck, I usually want to make the most of that opportunity.

Huge planning phases require lots of cards and the resources to play them. Because of that, there are a few heroes who lend themselves exceptionally well to this mindset. Arwen Undómiel and Leadership Denethor are the patron saints of early, on-demand resource acceleration. Erestor is the king of first-turn cards, and Galdor of the Havens is essentially the Erestor of combo decks.

While all of these heroes receive the praise that they rightfully deserve, they’re usually sprinkled in among other hero lineups to speed up existing archetypes. You don’t often see them all together in the same place in a deck that just says “damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!”

In fact, of the 2443 decks currently on RingsDB, only three feature Denethor/Arwen/Erestor or Denethor/Arwen/Galdor- and one of those three has received the attention it deserves, reaching the Hall of Fame.

In Denison’s take on the lineup, the goal is to get out as many high-value allies as possible as quickly as possible. Gildor Inglorion and the ally versions of Erestor, Glorfindel, Treebeard, and Over Hill, Under Hill Gandalf are as good or better than any heroes. In addition to the speed offered by Denethor and Arwen, Denison uses To the Sea, To the Sea! for a huge cost reduction on any Noldor allies he might have.

Moreover, To the Sea! serves as another deck accelerator. Once per game, he can dump his entire hand at once and trigger Galdor’s ability to draw six new cards. He can also dump his entire hand to play Lindir for free and draw three new cards. Once a few of those high-cost Noldor are in play at a steep discount, they can tell A Very Good Tale to bring out some more of their peers.

Elven-light is around to take advantage of all that discarding, and cards like Elwing’s Flight and The Evening Star aren’t generally worth their cost until they have a few copies in the discard pile, anyway.

So if, like me, you’re addicted to life in the fast lane, I’d recommend slowing things down for a bit and joining me on a short leisure cruise- just three hours or so- with a speedy Noldor deck that is certainly worth a second look.

Episode 104 – Tactics Feint

Click here to download this episode!

–  Welcome to Derek aka Shipwreck!

– News

– Epic Multiplayer Mode Report

– Flame of the West Player Card Review

– GenCon Report!

– Patreon pledge drive, any amount helps!! https://www.patreon.com/cotr

– Sign off

fellowship-spotlight-let-them-come

CotR Fellowship Spotlight: Let Them Come!

The introduction of RingsDB has invigorated the Lord of the Rings community, sparking creativity and enabling the sharing of ideas at a rate never before seen. With this explosive growth in new content, however, it is becoming easier and easier for interesting and exceptional work to fall through the cracks. The Deck Spotlight project is an attempt by the Cardboard of the Rings community to direct attention to deserving decks that, for one reason or another, have escaped notice.

Selected decks and fellowships might be especially unusual, creative, unique, strategic, or thematic. They might be funny, illuminating, powerful, or noteworthy for any of a number of other reasons. In all cases, however, the decks are worth a closer look.

 

Delving deep into RingsDB has been beneficial in exposing me to deck compositions that I otherwise would not have considered. As players, we tend to settle into our own preferred playstyles, developing a tunnel-vision that has us playing with the same staple cards in the same style decks. I’ve certainly recognized this in my play, so in an effort to step out of my comfort zone, I took a random 2-handed fellowship out for a spin. And you know what? It turned out to be pretty good.

Join us today, as CoTR shines a spotlight on…

Let Them Come!

by Traveller

Let Them Come!

 

Riding Sniper

Hero (3)
Éowyn (Core Set)
Glorfindel (Foundations of Stone)
Legolas (Core Set)

Ally (29)
1x Arwen Undómiel (The Watcher in the Water)
3x Curious Brandybuck (The Wastes of Eriador)
3x Defender of Rammas (Heirs of Númenor)
3x Dúnedain Hunter (The Lost Realm)
3x Envoy of Pelargir (Heirs of Númenor)
3x Ethir Swordsman (The Steward’s Fear)
3x Galadriel’s Handmaiden (Celebrimbor’s Secret)
1x Gandalf (Core Set)
3x Imladris Stargazer (Foundations of Stone)
3x Westfold Horse-breeder (The Voice of Isengard)
3x Zigil Miner (Khazad-dûm)

Attachment (10)
1x Black Arrow (On the Doorstep)
3x Light of Valinor (Foundations of Stone)
2x Miruvor (Shadow and Flame)
3x Rohan Warhorse (The Voice of Isengard)
1x Unexpected Courage (Core Set)

Event (11)
2x A Test of Will (Core Set)
3x Elrond’s Counsel (The Watcher in the Water)
1x Hands Upon the Bow (Shadow and Flame)

2x Stand and Fight (Core Set)
3x Unseen Strike (The Redhorn Gate)

 

Dunedain Support

Hero (3)
Beravor (Core Set)
Erkenbrand (The Antlered Crown)
Glóin (Core Set)

Ally (19)
2x Erebor Hammersmith (Core Set)
3x Erebor Record Keeper (Khazad-dûm)
1x Faramir (Core Set)
3x Galadriel (The Road Darkens)
3x Gandalf (Core Set)
1x Henamarth Riversong (Core Set)
3x Warden of Healing (The Long Dark)
3x Weather Hills Watchman (The Lost Realm)

Attachment (22)
1x Asfaloth (Foundations of Stone)
1x Boots from Erebor (Khazad-dûm)
3x Cram (Over Hill and Under Hill)
3x Dúnedain Mark (The Hunt for Gollum)
3x Dúnedain Warning (Conflict at the Carrock)
3x Expert Treasure-hunter (On the Doorstep)
1x Path of Need (Foundations of Stone)
3x Ranger Provisions (Across the Ettenmoors)
2x Self Preservation (Core Set)
2x Steward of Gondor (Core Set)

Event (9)
3x Daeron’s Runes (Foundations of Stone)
2x Sneak Attack (Core Set)
2x Strider’s Path (The Hunt for Gollum)
2x We Are Not Idle (Shadow and Flame)

 

What drew me to this fellowship was the sphere distributions and deck roles. My personal approach is to split my fellowships into dedicated “fighting” and “questing” decks, usually with a sphere split of tactics/leadership for combat and spirit/lore or spirit/leadership for questing. In Let Them Come!, the decks share the combat responsibilities: Dunedain Support handles defense while Riding Sniper range-kills stuff with Legolas. Colloquially, this is known as the hammer and anvil strategy.

What makes this approach work is that, by pairing tactics with spirit, Legolas can live in a low-threat deck, which turns Unseen Strike into an amazing event. That’s right: Unseen Strike. If you’re like me, and haven’t played this card since the Dwarrowdelf cycle, let me remind you that its effects last until the end of the phase. This means that, if you have Legolas loaded up with Rohan Warhorses, Miruvors, and/or Crams, you can repeatedly reap its benefits and put mega-progress on the quest.

Dunedain Support makes sure that Riding Sniper can do its thing, which means that it does everything else: healing, card draw, location control, resource generation, sentinel defense, and even more Legolas-buffing. Though unspecialized, this deck works because the obscene card draw from lore synergizes with the obscene resource generation from leadership. There’s no need to specialize when you have the means to play everything.

If you feel that you’re stuck in the comfort of your own playstyle, you may find this fellowship refreshing. If not, then you at least have access to another effective pairing. Regardless of where your experiences lie, this is a fellowship that is certainly worth a second look.

– WanderingTook

2016-08-17_9-55-11

CotR Deck Spotlight: Flame of the Support

The introduction of RingsDB has invigorated the Lord of the Rings community, sparking creativity and enabling the sharing of ideas at a rate never before seen. With this explosive growth in new content, however, it is becoming easier and easier for interesting and exceptional work to fall through the cracks. The Deck Spotlight project is an attempt by the Cardboard of the Rings community to direct attention to deserving decks that, for one reason or another, have escaped notice.

Selected decks and fellowships might be especially unusual, creative, unique, strategic, or thematic. They might be funny, illuminating, powerful, or noteworthy for any of a number of other reasons. In all cases, however, the decks are worth a closer look. Join us today, as CoTR shines a spotlight on…

Flame of the Support

By Osyluth

Flame of the Support

Hero (3)
Beregond (The Flame of the West)
Éowyn (The Flame of the West)
Haldir of Lórien (Trouble in Tharbad)

Ally (10)
2x Anfalas Herdsman (The Steward’s Fear)
3x Ethir Swordsman (The Steward’s Fear)
2x Master of the Forge (Shadow and Flame)
3x Warden of Healing (The Long Dark)

Attachment (19)
2x Ancient Mathom (A Journey to Rhosgobel)
1x Black Arrow (On the Doorstep)
2x Bow of the Galadhrim (The Nîn-in-Eilph)
3x Gondorian Shield (The Steward’s Fear)
2x Lembas (Trouble in Tharbad)
2x Raven-winged Helm (The Wastes of Eriador)
2x Rivendell Blade (Road to Rivendell)
2x Rivendell Bow (The Watcher in the Water)
3x Unexpected Courage (Core Set)

Event (21)
3x A Test of Will (Core Set)
3x Daeron’s Runes (Foundations of Stone)
2x Deep Knowledge (The Voice of Isengard)
3x Desperate Defense (The Flame of the West)
2x Feint (Core Set)
3x Foe-hammer (Over Hill and Under Hill)
2x Hasty Stroke (Core Set)
3x Sterner than Steel (The Flame of the West)

Player Side Quest (1)
1x Double Back (Escape from Mount Gram)

There I was at the Thursday evening Siege of Annuminas FFG GenCon event, teamed up with three completely random players for the second “middle” stage of the quest. We just sort of picked whatever combination of decks would not cause hero conflicts. Fortunately, I saw this deck from across the table.

Credit must be given to Seastan’s The Deck you Want Your Friend to Play for inspiring this deck, but this is a clever update that I’m spotlighting for a very timely purpose:

So often I just want to effectively use my new cards! Sure, I like the challenge of figuring out how to build a new deck with a new hero, but sometimes I just want a good deck to hit the table so I can see my new cardboard in action. This deck does just this. The new spirit and tactics events are in there as well as our new heroes. Heck, there’s probably even space to sneak in the new attachments is you would like.

Here’s why I love this hero combination:

  • Eowyn keeps your starting threat low to enable Haldir
  • Beregond is a great defender who reduces other player’s threat
  • Eowyn with the Rivendell Bow can smash an enemy from across the table

We absolutely dominated our portion of quest and we were in the fortunate situation to always decline Annuminas’s phase 2 bonuses and enable the other two player groups. Now, it was of course a team effort and the other three decks certainly pulled their weight, but this deck was clutch for us so many times.

 

deck-spotlight-top-10-songs-of-3016

CotR Deck Spotlight: Top 10 Songs of 3016

The introduction of RingsDB has invigorated the Lord of the Rings community, sparking creativity and enabling the sharing of ideas at a rate never before seen. With this explosive growth in new content, however, it is becoming easier and easier for interesting and exceptional work to fall through the cracks. The Deck Spotlight project is an attempt by the Cardboard of the Rings community to direct attention to deserving decks that, for one reason or another, have escaped notice.

Selected decks and fellowships might be especially unusual, creative, unique, strategic, or thematic. They might be funny, illuminating, powerful, or noteworthy for any of a number of other reasons. In all cases, however, the decks are worth a closer look.

 

If you listened to Episode 103, you heard me talking up the “inspired by” feature on RingsDB, which allows an author to link to a deck that it was derived from. Not only does this give credit where credit is due, but it also lets future deck-seekers trace a deck’s lineage; maybe some cards were changed to support a specific strategy, or maybe the deck was being updated to a more current version of the cardpool.

In honour of this feature, today I will showcase a fun little ditty that was derived from an FFG staff deck, and one from which I have myself drawn inspiration.

Join us today, as CoTR shines a spotlight on…

Top 10 Songs of 3016

by wilecki

http://ringsdb.com/decklist/view/2411/top-10-songs-of-3016-2.0

 

Hero (3)
Bifur (Khazad-dûm)
Bilbo Baggins (The Hunt for Gollum)
Gríma (The Voice of Isengard)

Ally (20)
1x Faramir (Core Set)
3x Gandalf (Core Set)
1x Gléowine (Core Set)
1x Haldir of Lórien (A Journey to Rhosgobel)
1x Henamarth Riversong (Core Set)
2x Isengard Messenger (The Voice of Isengard)
1x Longbeard Elder (Foundations of Stone)
1x Longbeard Map-Maker (Conflict at the Carrock)
1x Longbeard Orc Slayer (Core Set)
3x Master of the Forge (Shadow and Flame)
3x Rivendell Minstrel (The Hunt for Gollum)
2x Warden of Healing (The Long Dark)

Attachment (17)
1x A Burning Brand (Conflict at the Carrock)
1x Celebrían’s Stone (Core Set)
2x Forest Snare (Core Set)
3x Love of Tales (The Long Dark)
2x Miruvor (Shadow and Flame)
1x Protector of Lórien (Core Set)
3x Song of Kings (The Hunt for Gollum)
2x Song of Travel (The Hills of Emyn Muil)
1x Steward of Gondor (Core Set)
1x Thror’s Map (Over Hill and Under Hill)

Event (13)
2x A Test of Will (Core Set)
3x Durin’s Song (Khazad-dûm)
1x Dwarven Tomb (Core Set)
1x Lay of Nimrodel (The Morgul Vale)
2x Mithrandir’s Advice (The Steward’s Fear)
2x Power of Orthanc (The Voice of Isengard)
2x Sneak Attack (Core Set)

 

Decks in the Dwarrowdelf, Part One, originally published in an FFG staff deck article, was brought to RingsDB by Amerithrash (thank you for that). While the original played on Love of Tales, wilecki has taken the song deck in a darker direction. Top 10 Songs of 3016 adds Grima as backup vocalist to cash in on Middle Earth’s gothic rock movement.

The idea works rather well.  Like most resource advantage in the lore sphere, Love of Tales is slow to get going. Grima speeds things up considerably.  By mitigating the early-game tempo hit, you can cash in on Love of Tales in the mid-game without having sacrificed your board state.  That means you’ll have loads of cash to spend on your high-cost allies, Lay of Nimrodel, or Longbeard Map-Maker.  Know also that this deck has been hardened by fire.  The author has finely tuned this deck, and the current iteration is capable of completing most of the Dwarrowdelf quests.

The only really downside is that significant deck space has been given up for the auxiliary support cards necessary for solo play, and you will only be playing solo, because, well… you’ll be using Grima a lot.

It’s fascinating how much wilecki has managed to alter the feel of the original deck with only a few changes.  This just goes to show that, despite the relatively small size of the player card pool (compared to the competitive LCGs), this game is rich with possibilities. So, if you don’t mind playing solo, or if your name is Brandon and you like grief-decking your friends, this deck is definitely worth a second look.

 

Now, just as wilecki drew inspiration from FFG for his deck, so to have I drawn inspiration from Top 10 Songs of 3016 (you can see my derivation here).  How about you?  Does today’s spotlight spark any ideas in your head?  Perhaps someone can find a way to make this deck more multiplayer-friendly, or maybe update it to take on The Battle of Carn Dum.  Just remember to copy one of these decks first; that way RingsDB will automatically fill out your deck’s parentage.  One day it’ll be fun to dive through the family tree to see how player strategies have evolved.

– WanderingTook

CotR Deck Spotlight: Suicidal Support for Super Bilbo

The introduction of RingsDB has invigorated the Lord of the Rings community, sparking creativity and enabling the sharing of ideas at a rate never before seen. With this explosive growth in new content, however, it is becoming easier and easier for interesting and exceptional work to fall through the cracks. The Deck Spotlight project is an attempt by the Cardboard of the Rings community to direct attention to deserving decks that, for one reason or another, have escaped notice.

Selected decks and fellowships might be especially unusual, creative, unique, strategic, or thematic. They might be funny, illuminating, powerful, or noteworthy for any of a number of other reasons. In all cases, however, the decks are worth a closer look. Join us today, as CoTR shines a spotlight on…

Suicidal Support for Super Bilbo

by Rajam

Suicidal Support for Super Bilbo
Hero (3)
Boromir (The Dead Marshes)
Caldara (The Blood of Gondor)
Treebeard (The Treason of Saruman)

Attachment (35)
3x Boots from Erebor (Khazad-dûm)
3x Ent Draught (The Treason of Saruman)
3x Fast Hitch (The Dead Marshes)
3x Gondorian Shield (The Steward’s Fear)
3x Good Meal (The Redhorn Gate)
2x Keys of Orthanc (The Voice of Isengard)
3x Love of Tales (The Long Dark)
3x Palantir (Assault on Osgiliath)
2x Song of Battle (The Dead Marshes)
3x Song of Eärendil (Road to Rivendell)
3x Song of Kings (The Hunt for Gollum)
3x Song of Travel (The Hills of Emyn Muil)
1x The Fall of Gil-Galad (The Dunland Trap)

Event (15)
3x Daeron’s Runes (Foundations of Stone)
3x Deep Knowledge (The Voice of Isengard)
3x Desperate Alliance (On the Doorstep)
3x Message from Elrond (The Three Trials)
3x The Seeing-stone (The Voice of Isengard)

There are a lot of decks on the internet that are fun to play. There are plenty that are powerful, capable of crushing quests and securing victories with ease. This deck isn’t either of those things. I mean, just look at it- Caldara with no other spirit heroes? Boromir without Gondorian Fire or Blood of Numenor? Hero Treebeard with no healing? No allies? It’s a mismatched hodgepodge of bits and pieces that makes no sense as a coherent deck designed to defeat quests.

But that’s precisely the point; it’s not designed to defeat the encounter deck. It’s designed to lose, to fail, to fall into ruin. Not only that, it’s designed to do so quickly, to do so consistently, and most radically, to do so of its own volition. That’s the common thread that ties together these three heroes. All are able to in one way or another kill themselves off without any encounter deck input.

And why would anyone want to intentionally kill off their own heroes while getting nothing from it? Because of an oddity in how the rules work. During the staging step of the quest phase, the encounter deck reveals one card for each surviving player. One player’s voluntary demise makes the quest easier for all players who survive him!

The question then becomes “how much can one do in the space of a single planning phase before committing suicide?” To that end, Rajam has loaded up with plenty of useful 0- and 1-cost attachments that can be played across the table, as well as enough draw events to fish them out quickly.

I’ve never actually played this deck, nor the one partnered up with it. I don’t think I ever will. But sometimes you stumble across a deck that opens your eyes to possibilities that you’d never before considered. I remember the first time I saw someone use a Boromir deck. I remember the first time I heard someone mention a Gloin deck. I remember all sorts of new combos, but most importantly, I remember the fresh ideas and approaches to common problems that would have a profound impact on how I built decks going forward.

And I remember the first time I stumbled across Rajam’s unassuming suicide deck and became aware of the possibility of a support deck so selfless it actually sacrificed itself for the good of the fellowship. I remember the feeling of possibilities opening up before my eyes.

For that reason, this is without question a deck that’s worth a second look.

deck-spotlight-ready-for-the-storm

CotR Deck Spotlight: Ready for the Storm

The introduction of RingsDB has invigorated the Lord of the Rings community, sparking creativity and enabling the sharing of ideas at a rate never before seen. With this explosive growth in new content, however, it is becoming easier and easier for interesting and exceptional work to fall through the cracks. The Deck Spotlight project is an attempt by the Cardboard of the Rings community to direct attention to deserving decks that, for one reason or another, have escaped notice.

Selected decks and fellowships might be especially unusual, creative, unique, strategic, or thematic. They might be funny, illuminating, powerful, or noteworthy for any of a number of other reasons. In all cases, however, the decks are worth a closer look.

 

Today we are going to delve deep into the archives. Even though RingsDB is a relatively recent addition to the community, it still surprises me how quickly the card pool and meta-game have evolved since its inception; and yet, fascinating ideas and potentially meta-changing observations frequently fall through the cracks. I think today’s feature perfectly exemplifies why we started this spotlight series. This deck has been buried for a long time, and even though it is a whopping four months old (ancient in internet time), it still has some tricks to teach us.

Join us today, as CoTR shines a spotlight on…

Ready for the Storm [(mostly) Noldor Swarm]

by ransomman

http://ringsdb.com/decklist/view/70/ready-for-the-storm-mostly-noldor-swarm-1.0

 

Hero (3)
Bifur (Khazad-dûm)
Círdan the Shipwright (The Grey Havens)
Faramir (The Land of Shadow)

Ally (19)
2x Arwen Undómiel (The Watcher in the Water)
2x Elven Jeweler (Escape from Mount Gram)
1x Erestor (The Long Dark)
1x Galadriel (The Road Darkens)
2x Galdor of the Havens (The Treachery of Rhudaur)
2x Gandalf (Core Set)
1x Gildor Inglorion (The Hills of Emyn Muil)
1x Gimli (The Treason of Saruman)
1x Lindir (The Battle of Carn Dûm)
2x Lindon Navigator (The Grey Havens)
2x Sailor of Lune (The Grey Havens)
2x Warden of the Havens (The Grey Havens)

Attachment (14)
3x Light of Valinor (Foundations of Stone)
3x Narya (The Grey Havens)
3x Steward of Gondor (Core Set)
3x To the Sea, to the Sea! (The Grey Havens)
2x Unexpected Courage (Core Set)

Event (17)
3x A Test of Will (Core Set)
3x A Very Good Tale (Over Hill and Under Hill)
3x Daeron’s Runes (Foundations of Stone)
3x Elrond’s Counsel (The Watcher in the Water)
3x Elven-light (The Dread Realm)
1x Stand and Fight (Core Set)
1x Will of the West (Core Set)

 

The leadership hero version of Faramir has gotten mixed reviews, in part because building around him is not a trivial matter. He seems to be ideally suited for a Gondor swarm deck, but in practice, few Gondor allies are worth readying during the encounter phase. Because of this, the community is starting to realize that Faramir is far more potent when he is pulled out of his Gondorian comfort zone. His synergy with Ents is a good example; this deck offers an alternate approach.

Rather than shoe-horning leadership Faramir into an Ent deck just for his ability, Ready for the Storm uses his accompanying leadership icon to shore up the defense power of the Noldor archetype.

This deck relies on Arwen (ally) and Narya to turn reasonably strong allies into mighty defenders. The deck description details how to buff Gildor Inglorian up to a whopping 7 defense (via janky usage of A Very Good Tale), but he is far from the only target. Warden of the Havens can be made equally strong, and Gimli and Gandalf are close seconds.

If it wasn’t already apparent, I gave this deck the spotlight because it lets you get serious mileage out of leadership Faramir. Apart from that, it posits an alternative role for A Very Good Tale, in which you can reap the benefits of Arwen’s ability even if it whiffs. In addition, it uses “panned” cards to great effect; namely Lindon Navigator and Warden of the Havens, which conveniently also work very well together.

It may look odd at first glance, but there are some good ideas in here. If you had a chance to catch the Arwenian Brick Wall deck by emorlecallor (which, coincidently, is on the front page as I write this), you’ll find that Ready for the Storm starts with the same basic idea (Arwen jank), but takes it in a very different direction. This is certainly a deck worth looking at.

– WanderingTook